Living for the Revel (catvalente) wrote,
Living for the Revel
catvalente

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Arisia

I will be at Arisia all weekend, and more or less open for dinners and lunches and such. Below is my schedule--please try to come to one of these, especially the reading! And pray there will be Orphan's Tales in the dealer room this time...

And also? Slipstream with me and nihilistic_kid? Should be fucking hilarious. Don't miss it.

711     Literature      Reshaping Grimm & Goose Fri 7:00 PM 

       Updating the fairy tale for modern day.  Would a Dame come to the rescue of a gentle lord?  Would Hansel & Gretel have a GPS?  Some wonderful books of fantasy have come from re-imagining old tales.  How do we reshape the tales and retain their spirit -- or change it completely.


862     Fan Interest    Japanese Culture for the (World)Con-goer        Sat 10:00 AM   

       The 2007 Worldcon is in Japan for the first time. How to avoid diplomatic incidents for the American fan.  Singing "Turning Japanese"? When and where to blow your nose? And about that subway crowding?


829     Literature      Flying Through the Slipstream   Sat 2:00 PM     01:00

       First mentioned by Bruce Sterling, slipstream is fiction that doesn't fit into either the science fiction/fantasy or mainstream literary fiction category.  Both Audrey Niffenegger's novel "The Time Traveler's Wife" and Alejandro Agresti's movie "The Lake House" deal with time travel.  Why are they seen as acceptable to a mainstream audience and marketed that way?  Is slipstream fiction "just" genre fiction tidied up and made presentable to a larger audience or are there other differences?


Sat 4:30 pm Reading


703, Literature      Tradition and Change       Sun 12:00 PM

Our history can be interpreted as an ever-shifting balance between keeping the old and making the new.  Often a novelist can present an iconoclastic main character warring against a staid society.  What works have best presented the clash between preserving traditions and breaking new ground?

764     Literature      Can One Write Readable Gender-Expanding SF?     Sun 1:00 PM   

       Can one write readable gender-expanding SF?

An example is Delaney's The Einstein Intersection -- a total reevaluation of gender, but nearly incomprehensible.  Is our understanding of character too wrapped up in our notions of gender? This doesn't mean simply warping the genders we currently recognize.  Rather, this panel asks whether starting from recognizable genders is necessary for us to be able to comprehend a story

Come one, come all!
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