c is for cat

Rules for Anchorites

Letters from Proxima Thule

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
Nothing Is As Big Inside Me/As I Am/When I Am Inside Me
eliot
catvalente

I have a new poem out today!

I am as proud of it as a short story so it gets its own post.

The Melancholy of Mecha Girl is a philosophical confessional poem about anime and giant robots. You can read it right over here, as Mythic Delirium, giant of the poetry world and 25th Birthday Girl, has chosen it as one of the issue’s featured poems.

This means! You can hear me reading it aloud as well as reading it yourself. And hopefully while you’re over there subscribe or just buy the issue, as it has many other amazing poets including Sonya Taaffe, Jeannine Hall Gailey (who inspired my own poem!), Mari Ness, Jessica Paige Wick, and Rachel Manija Brown.

I feel like I’m tentatively forging a new voice and a new phase in my poetry. I’m not really sure I could describe what it is, but this poem is definitely part of that. It’s exciting to me, and I hope it’s exciting to you, too.

Mirrored from cmv.com. Also appearing on @LJ and @DW. Read anywhere, comment anywhere.


I love your poetry, and often expect it to be surprising and challenging, but somehow this poem caught me off-guard and inverted every expectation I had (and I didn't even know I had expectations!)

I want to say something about this poem, I really, really do, but I can't quite get there. I might say I find your thoughts on gender interesting -- I might say this is a poem I am excited to share with my brother, who will like a world where robots need girls -- or that I love listening to your poetry recordings.

But mostly, I come back to the realization that your poetry always makes me want to write my own. I'm not sure why that is. I just do. It has the same effect on me as Anna Akhmatova does -- I want to stretch and lean into the space where poetry lives inside me. The poems which I've been given and those I have to give grow together like grafts and become indistinguishable in my head, and I want to pull out a gift from the fruits of that strange tree, to acknowledge the borrowed roots of my creative drive.

So thank you for your gift, of poetry that makes me think and compels me to write.

Instantly I was transported back to Megatokyo (from Bubblegum Crisis, not from the comic by Fred Gallagher), and to Tokyo 3.

Thank you.

I made an icon; I was inspired.

I, for one, am a new reader and super excited to experience your poetry. (Am also STOKED to hear you plug Jeannine Hall Gailey who is relevant to my interests, but I've never heard anyone else even mention her work - clearly I am running in the wrong circles.) But I picked up Myths... this week, and can't wait to start reading this evening. I've had The Labrynth wish-listed for a while, and after you described the narrative as circular, I decided that was the best possible place to jump in and get lost.

The way I recognize good poetry is that it leaves me feeling almost smart enough to understand it (or smart enough to almost understand it). Glimpses of meaning pop out, but do not linger, as of the flowing syllables continue. It calls for multiple readings (listenings) to be fully appreciated.

To put it more simply, I like it.

Edited at 2011-12-09 05:28 am (UTC)

I was just thinking the other day that giant robot anime were sort of inherently conservative -- they're always about 'putting on your big-boy pants' and engaging the adult world. About all the judgement/call-to-change they can stomach is, "The adult world is dishonest, but we will do better. We will remember our humanity and its obligations."

What a lovely subversion of that form this is!

Oh, Cat. I love this so much I don't have words to express it. I want people to make scents and shiny things out of it. You are just better every time you put a new thing in the world. <3

And this is what pushed me over the line and got me to subscribe to Mythic Delirium, which I have considered before and never gone through on. So I can have this poem in hard copy on my shelf.

Oh wow, that one snuck up on me and knocked me over.

I'm liking your new voice. I've read and re-read The Secret of Being a Cowgirl and passed it on to friends.

I am...

Jealous.

I wish I wish I wish I could write a poem like that. All beautiful words and emotion and gut punch and...

Wow. Amazing work, Cat. But I've come to expect nothing less from you, even if I do want to eat your brain. :) (in a good way)

Wow. That is kind of heartbreaking. Gorgeous.